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Top Breeder Ole Sein Explains Why He Chose Commercialisation of Sahiwal Cows

Benjamin ole Sein is a civil servant and a refined livestock breeder from Arroi area of Mashuuru Sub County who has revolutionalised farming in Kajiado.

Sein divides his time between serving at Kenyatta National Hospital as anaesthetist and managing more than 150 Sahiwal cows and 200 Dorper Sheep in his Arroi Dorpers Farm Ltd.

He also has a family that demands the little remaining time he has each busy day.

“From 2001, I have never known of free time because of my busy schedule. I can work throughout the night at KNH and as I reach home, my children want to have their time with me. Before I can hardly settle, my farm manager could be seeking my attention,” says an ever busy Sein.

Sein has more than 150 herds of Sahiwal cattle which he trades on them by selling to other local farmers and meat outlets across the country.

The present Sahiwal cattle in Kenya are descendants of some 60 bulls and 12 cows imported between 1939 and 1963.

The Sahiwal breed also is considered unequaled in transmitted effects for milk production among Bos indicus breeds.

Kenya is the main country inAfrica with major resources of Bos indicus Sahiwal cattle and serves as an important source of stock and semen for the continent.

The Sahiwal originated in the dry Punjab region which lies along the Indian-Pakistani border. They were once kept in large herd by professional herdsmen called “Junglies”.

However with the introduction of irrigation to the region they began to be kept in smaller numbers by the farmers of the region, who used them as draft and dairy animals.

The Sahiwal is one of the best dairy breeds in India and Pakistan.

It is tick-resistant, heat-tolerant and noted for its high resistance to parasites, both internal and external.

Cows average 2270 kg of milk during lactation while suckling a calf and much higher milk yields have been recorded.

Due to their heat tolerance and high milk production they have been exported to other Asian countries as well as Africa and the Caribbean.

As oxen they are generally docile and lethargic, making them more useful for slow work.

Their colour can range from reddish brown through to the more predominant red, with varying amounts of white on the neck, and the underline.

In bulls the color darkens towards the extremities, such as the head, legs and tails.

Sahiwals are predominately used in Australia for beef production, as crossing high grade Sahiwal sires with Bos taurus animals produced a carcass of lean quality with desirable fat cover.

The Sahiwal is the heaviest milker of all Zebu breeds and display a well developed udder.

Sahiwals demonstrate the ability to sire small, fast-growing calves and are noted for their hardiness under unfavorable climatic conditions.

The contribution of the Sahiwal breed to adaptability is well documented in Kenya, Jamaica, Guyana, Burundi, Somalia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria and several ecological zones of Africawhere Sahiwals have been crossed with exotic Bos taurus breeds that have a high response capability for milk and beef production but lack adaptability to local conditions.

The present Sahiwal cattle in Kenya are descendants of some 60 bulls and 12 cows imported between 1939 and 1963.

The Sahiwal breed also is considered unequalled in transmitted effects for milk production among Bos indicus breeds.

Kenya is the main country in Africa with major resources of Bos indicus Sahiwal cattle and serves as an important source of stock and semen for the continent.

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